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Thread: Fun Facts About Science (Excluding Animals)

  1. #1
    Meow! :)
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    Default Fun Facts About Science (Excluding Animals)

    Since, there is already a fun facts about animals, why not have it for the rest of science?

    In here, you can post stuff relating to Earth, and all the way to space for example. Expect anything related to animals as there is already a thread on here about that.

    So, to start off the thread, here are some fun facts I want to share with you all:

    - Antarctica is actually considered a desert because of its low precipitation.

    - The color of the sun in space is actually white, not yellow. It is yellow to us on Earth because of our atmosphere.

    - The name of our moon is "Moon".

  2. #2
    Meow! :)
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    Default Re: Fun Facts About Science (Excluding Animals)


  3. #3
    Meow! :)
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    Default Re: Fun Facts About Science (Excluding Animals)


  4. #4
    Gunpowder is fun. Katzztar's Avatar
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    Wisconsin, USA

    Default Re: Fun Facts About Science (Excluding Animals)

    Sorry but I have to take this chance to post this from They Might Be Giants=

    "Gunpowder" Lagoon Fishhawk, here.
    What's your pirate name? use the funny name generator here

  5. #5
    Gunpowder is fun. Katzztar's Avatar
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    Wisconsin, USA

    Default Re: Fun Facts About Science (Excluding Animals)

    "Gunpowder" Lagoon Fishhawk, here.
    What's your pirate name? use the funny name generator here

  6. #6
    The Mad Moiselle BellisarioFaith's Avatar
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    Default Re: Fun Facts About Science (Excluding Animals)

    A science thread? Ooh, wonderful.
    • The brightest star in the night sky is Sirius, the dog star, a double-star system, located about 8.6 light-years from Earth.
    • In the night sky of the northern hemisphere, the three stars Sirius (in Canis Major), Procyon (in Canis Minor), and Betelgeuse (in Orion) make up the Winter Triangle. Similarly, the three stars Vega (in Lyra), Deneb (in Cygnus), and Altair (in Aquila) make up the Summer Triangle.
    • The closest star outside of the solar system to the Earth is Proxima Centauri, also known as Alpha Centauri C, part of the Alpha Centauri triple-star system. It is located about 4.25 light-years from Earth.
    • In the Alpha Centauri system, both Alpha Centauri B and Proxima Centauri have at least one known exoplanet apiece orbiting them.
    • The planet Saturn has a density that is less than that of water, meaning that if you could find a tub of water large enough to place it in, Saturn would float.
    • The seven days of the week were named for the seven major celestial bodies discovered at the time: Sunday for the Sun, Monday for the Moon, Tuesday for Mars (named for Norse god of combat Tiw, whose Roman God equivalent is Mars), Wednesday for Mercury (named for the pagan god Woden/Norse Odin, equated with Roman god Mercury), Thursday for Jupiter (named for Norse God Thor, whose Roman equivalent is Jupiter), Friday for Venus (named for Frigg, the Old English goddess whose Roman equal is Venus), and Saturday for Saturn.
    • Due to Earth's wobble on its axis (called "precession"), its north pole will point to the bright star Vega (in the constellation Lyra) in about 13,000 years, making Vega our new North Star. About 5,000 years ago, our North Star was Thuban (in Draco). Our current North Star, Polaris (in Ursa Minor), will once again be the North Star in about 26,000 years.
    And so that it's not only astronomy here, biology tidbit!
    • When considering the two most common blood group systems (ABO and Rh), which together give 8 different bloodtype classifications (A+, A-, B+, B-, AB+, AB-, O+, or O-), type AB+ is known as the "universal receiver"; people with this blood type have A, B, and Rh antigens in their red blood cells, and thus none of the three antibodies in their blood serum, and so can receive any of the 8 blood types in a blood transfusion.
    • Conversely, in these same two systems, O- blood is the "universal donor"; carriers of this blood type don't have any of the three antigens in their red blood cells, and thus their blood can be used in a transfusion with any of the 8 blood types in these groups.
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